Friday, September 9, 2011

British Word of the Day

You might be glad to know this is the last inept installment of UK English 101. I'm back home from London now, exhausted and dreading the unpacking, but very happy. I'll tell you about my trip later. Look here and here for updates on the word of the day posts. Thanks for correcting my British!

Pudding: this seems to have quite a different meaning in the UK than what Americans know fondly as pudding. Ours: creamy flavored custard that is made with milk from a Jell-O instant mix (unless of course you are notable American, Martha Stewart, in which case vanilla beans, free-range eggs and copper saucepans are involved).

In the UK, pudding seems to be any dessert, right? "If you don't eat your meat, you can't have any pudding. How can you have any pudding if you don't eat your MEAT?" (said with Scots accent, in honor of my husband, Michael, who likes Pink Floyd, and who nicely volunteered to do a few guest posts about football and NASCAR while I was away.)

8 comments:

  1. I can't wait to hear about your trip - I hope everyone you met was friendly and you had a marvellous time!

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  2. We had a marvelous time indeed! It was brilliant! :-) I won't say everyone was friendly, but most people were. Just like everywhere, I suppose.

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  3. I've enjoyed every British Word of the Day post, and the comments from your readers and friends in the UK!

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  4. I remember being told by my mother that pudding as a word was posh, dessert was a bit common! The same applied to Napkin- middle class, a bit posh, serviette- hmm, common again! Class barriers have come down a bit these days, informality rules. Hope you enjoyed London, it is a vivacious and fun city! Not the friendliest place, everyone is fast, work, gotta get somewhere- you have to get to the other regions for a better welcome!

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  5. In Australia we call 'pudding' (or dessert) 'sweets'. In the UK they have 'sweets' and we have 'lollies'. My husband is English, I am Australian, and from as soon as she could talk, our daughter could use the correct lingo with either of us to get what she wanted! There are lots of other examples too where she would use different words with me or with him. Glad you had a good time, we lived there for 9 years and it was brill! (as they say!).

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  6. Indeed I love my puds!!! I will miss your British word of the day, because I am learning American words!

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  7. Correct! Pudding is any dessert and we always, always use it as a bribe to get our children to eat their main course (works every time in our house, especially if it's Raspberry Ripple icecream). The American version of pudding sounds nice!

    Dawn xx

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  8. There are also savoury puddings as well, suet pudding etc, just to confuse you...

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